Programming

AgrAbility Conference

Since my time in Extension, I have been fortunate to become aware of an excellent program for agricultural workers with disabilities or chronic illness. This program is known as AgrAbility and my colleague Susan Harris-Broomfield recently wrote an article about an upcoming conference hosted by Nebraska AgrAbility. The workshop, hosted by Nebraska AgrAbility, is the foremost educational event in the nation addressing disabilities in agriculture. Potential clients and their families, AgrAbility staff members and stakeholders — including U.S. Department of Agriculture and rehabilitation professionals, other nonprofit members, and suppliers of products beneficial to AgrAbility customers — are invited. The AgrAbility National Training Workshop will occur from March 25-28 at the Embassy Suites in downtown Lincoln.

barn on field against sky
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

The program will offer information on leveraging resources and direct service to clients; networking opportunities with other clients, service providers and agency representatives; and training. Registration is required at http://www.agrability.org/agrability-national-training-workshop. Registration closes March 21.

AgrAbility aims to enhance the quality of life for farmers, ranchers and other agricultural workers with disabilities so that they, their families and communities can continue to succeed.

Nebraska AgrAbility’s team includes Nebraska Extension educators Nancy Frecks and Susan Harris-Broomfield, University of Nebraska faculty member Aaron Yoder and Nebraska Easterseals staff members Angie Howell, Rod Peterson, Emily Freudenburg and John Davis.

Success can have multiple meanings, whether it is getting back to one’s own business, gaining employment in agricultural production or gaining the assistive technology needed to complete everyday tasks. Nebraska AgrAbility’s priorities are to develop educational programs that increase individual knowledge, advance capabilities through new technologies, encourage peer networking and provide direct services to agricultural workers in need. Nebraska AgrAbility has worked with 567 clients since 1995, serving clients in 92 of the state’s 93 counties.

For more information on Nebraska AgrAbility, visit https://agrability.unl.edu.

Source: Article written at IANR news from Susan Harris-Broomfield, Nebraska Extension Educator

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